21 September 2008

This is why boys think girls are stupid

Despite having a small number of followers on my Twitter account, I received a surprising amount of feedback over the last couple of days regarding a back-and-forth Twitter conversation between Dana and myself. People were having trouble fully piecing together the conversation because of the way Twitter is laid out, so they contacted me about it.

Another reason it's hard for anyone who cares to understand the conversation is because Dana has since deleted all but one of her tweets that were part of our conversation, you know, the ones that begin with "@JSpaghetti".

This is the only tweet that she did not trash: @JSpaghetti WTF? I've never been rude to you. What's with your drama? I've been nothing but nice to you until all of this right now.

Sooo if someone NOW sees this tweet from Dana, and NOW tries to piece together the conversation, and tries to figure out WTF this JSpaghetti chic did that was so rude to Dana, the ten or so related tweets NOW read (in reverse chronological order, which is how Twitter is laid out):

ME: @Mamalogues One thing I've learned: no matter how cool you think you are to people, their perception of you - that's reality.

ME: @Mamalogues No drama on my end, being honest. And if someone says you were rude to them and you deny it, that doesn't mean you weren't rude.

ME: @Mamalogues And by the way, I didn't suddenly unfollow you. I haven't followed you since the blogger gathering when you were rude to me.

ME: @Mamalogues I'm rude; big deal. I thought "many don't understand economics 101 or can even define the job of the fed" was a lame response.

ME: @Mamalogues A little of both.

ME: @Mamalogues I didn't want to debate, but if you're so strapped on time, why are you still tweeting about oxymorons? THAT'S an oxymoron.

ME: ...@Mamalogues... I think you had a mix-up on one of your last tweets. It should read: It should be mandatory for the GOVERNMENT to understand the economy and THEIR ROLE. The misconceptions and lack of info are ridiculous.

ME: ...The lender wants their money. They convince the person, who really shouldn't buy a house, feel like they can. That's predatory lending.

ME: ...take out the loan, seek one anyway. These people cannot comprehend and understand the convoluted and complicated contract language...

ME: @Mamalogues True, nobody MADE those people take out loans. What happens is, people who aren't exactly in a financial position to...


Um, okay?

Since Dana deleted all of her other tweets from her side of our conversation, the conversation doesn't even make sense. If any person has the attention span to get through those last five or six of my tweets, they'll see me write "I'm rude; big deal" and then decide that - "Yep, Dana was right. This JSpaghetti chic IS rude." Or they might see that most of my tweets are directed @Mamalogues, while she only wrote one @JSpaghetti.

Newsflash: I'm not an idiot. Dana purposely deleted comments to make me look like I couldn't let something go and that I just kept badgering her.

I don't even know what to think of that, but I know the difference between right and wrong - and that's just wrong; deleting most of a conversation except the one statement that says @JSpaghetti WTF? I've never been rude to you. What's with your drama? I've been nothing but nice to you until all of this right now.

That's wrong. wRonG. WRONG.

I know everyone is entitled to their own deleting policy, but I naively assumed most people delete tweets because of misspelled words, or because of that double-publish thing that twitter sometimes does, or perhaps drunk twittering, etc. But, deleting most of a conversation with exception to the one where you deny being rude, say I'm giving you drama, and say you've been nothing but nice?

Maybe you don't understand; Dana, "being nice" encompasses much more than smiles, blasé conversation and handshakes. Rudeness comes from tone of voice, facial expressions, body language, and so much more. Perception is reality. And based on the comments I received about the Twitter conversation, it seemed like everyone thought you were rude and dramatic, not me.

Luckily, I did have so many questions and comments about Dana's and my conversation right from the beginning, I had copied and pasted them ALL. But the questions kept coming and then kinda got weird, so I just went back to twitter to see what was up. And that's when I saw that there was now only one @JSpaghetti reference.

So below is the original conversation, in whole. For the record, I really only got involved because I was trying to support @Jaelithe, and the next thing you know - this happens.

And it's fucking stupid.

F-U-C-K-I-N-G stupid.

-----

DANA: @jaelithe Nobody made those people take loans though. People lived beyond their means and that isn't the country's fault.

ME: @Mamalogues True, nobody MADE those people take out loans. What happens is, people who aren't exactly in a financial position to...

ME: ...take out the loan, seek one anyway. These people cannot comprehend and understand the convoluted and complicated contract language...

ME: ...The lender wants their money. They convince the person, who really shouldn't buy a house, feel like they can. That's predatory lending.

DANA: It should be mandatory for people to understand the economy and the role of the Fed. The misconceptions and lack of info are ridiculous

ME: ...@Mamalogues... I think you had a mix-up on one of your last tweets. It should read: It should be mandatory for the GOVERNMENT to understand the economy and THEIR ROLE. The misconceptions and lack of info are ridiculous.

DANA: @JSpaghetti that as well but so many don't understand economics 101 or can even define the job of the fed. no time to debate today though.

DANA: it's funny, people want assloads of cash for entitlement programs but when fannie, et al go QUASI national people freak out. oxymoron.

ME: @Mamalogues I didn't want to debate, but if you're so strapped on time, why are you still tweeting about oxymorons? THAT'S an oxymoron.

DANA: @JSpaghetti are you trying to have a discussion or be rude?

ME: @Mamalogues A little of both.

ME: @Mamalogues I'm rude; big deal. I thought "many don't understand economics 101 or can even define the job of the fed" was a lame response.

DANA: and hells bells, if i don't share your every waking opinion, unfollow! people grow the hell up.

ME: @Mamalogues And by the way, I didn't suddenly unfollow you. I haven't followed you since the blogger gathering when you were rude to me.

DANA: @JSpaghetti WTF? I've never been rude to you. What's with your drama? I've been nothing but nice to you until all of this right now.

ME: @Mamalogues No drama on my end, being honest. And if someone says you were rude to them and you deny it, that doesn't mean you weren't rude.

DANA: Done with people's drama. This is ridiculous. Moving on.

DANA: One thing I've learned is that no matter how cool you are to people, some will just dislike you anyway. I give up.

ME: @Mamalogues One thing I've learned: no matter how cool you think you are to people, their perception of you - that's reality.

----

And that is why boys think girls are stupid.

I would never have posted about this trivial bullshit. But now I have to, so I can give my side of the story...because Dana decided to delete her part of the conversation.

So that was the conversation, and now you can make up your own mind. Whether the comments are good, bad, or ugly, I am not publishing any of them. The whole thing is stupid.

Oh, and by the way, I can't even believe you made it to the end of the post.


------------
Listening to: Primus - Wynona's Big Brown Beaver
------------

17 September 2008

The fart heard next door

James' uncle is staying with us for a few days before those two head off to Chicago. We've never had company before because, well, we just moved in.

Sometime before seven this morning, I heard a distant fart.

I said to James, "Was that Mike?"

James said nothing because he was thinking, "Obviously."

Mike answered my question, "Yes."

Pause.

I don't even know how to respond to this situation, especially since I was giggling.

Mike says, "Good Morning."

--------------
Listening to: the dishwasher
--------------

12 September 2008

I don't even know what the hell to title this one, but at least it ends on a positive note

Compared to my friends - my parents were strict. In third grade I wasn't allowed to wear makeup. In sixth grade I wasn't allowed to go on "dates" and paint my nails fire engine red. In ninth grade I wasn't allowed to "ride around" with friends who'd barely had any driving experience. Just because everyone else's parents were letting them do those things, that didn't mean it was a good idea for me to do them, too.

I wasn't allowed to wear makeup until I was 13. I wasn't allowed to "date" until after I was 16. That's because I wasn't allowed to ride in a car with my teenage friends until I turned 16. In fact, I turned 16 on a Tuesday. The weekend before, my boyfriend mustered up the courage to ask my dad if he could pick me up for school on Monday morning (I was still riding the bus back and forth - which was TOTALLY embarrassing!). My dad calmly and sternly responded, "Nope. Jeannette turns 16 on Tuesday. You can pick her up for school then."

Heck, I never even had a standardized curfew. The time I was to be home was determined on a case-by-case basis. As my dad put it, "When I say nine o'clock, I mean fifteen minutes before nine, not five minutes after - got it." Yes, I got it. I don't think I came home late - ever. Keep in mind that between me and my friends were train tracks, coal train tracks. Coal trains are the longest, slowest and worst type of train to possibly get stopped by. Especially when getting caught by a train was not an acceptable reason to be home late because, "you know you have to cross the tracks, so you need to plan for that to ensure you'll be home on time even if you get stopped by a train."

I hated it then, but I get it now.

I developed early, matured fast, always looked older than my actual age - and as we all felt during those years - I knew I was a mature adult who was smart enough to figure everything out on my own. My parents knew better; I might've been mature, but I had a lot to learn before I could be considered an actual adult. Hell, I'm an adult now and I still have a lot to learn.

One thing that my mom kept me sheltered from was scary movies. When everybody else got to see Texas Chainsaw Massacre, the Jason and Freddy movies, Halloween, the Exorcist, etc - I never saw any of it. In fact, all of those movies I still probably wouldn't have seen if it weren't for James. I was never even curious about them. 

Back in the day, my mom's logic was that I would see real violence on the news and be exposed to real violence in real life. If I watched said violence, I'd be aware of it for the rest of my life. She wanted me to enjoy my innocence for as long as possible, before I discovered that life is scary and hard. I always understood this - even as a kid. I don't remember feeling left out because all of my friends were watching scary movies. I kinda thought - scary movie? - I don't like being scared. Plus, I don't really watch a lot of movies and we don't even have cable. I'll go play in the yard.

On the other hand, they always let me listen to music via KSHE 95. I can remember in grade school, hanging out in my room doing whatever (not playing with dolls - fuck that shit) listening to my pink radio tuned to K-SHE, falling asleep to the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Eric Clapton, the Rolling stones, Pink Floyd, etc. I didn't understand what exactly they were singing about, but the music induced such a variety of positive emotions and I loved it. Meanwhile, I was listening to all kinds of songs about drugs and my parents never sheltered me from that. When I asked questions, they gave honest answers. But they let me listen to whatever music made me feel good.

Once when I was a teenager, I was listening to Megadeth very loudly in my room. My dad came beating on the door and upon answering, he screamed, "HEY - Turn that shit up!"

Cool.

Those are some of the reasons why I love music so much today. Honestly, I might go insane without it. When I lived on my own I didn't have a TV because I always listened to music; I will never miss movies and TV, but I might actually die without music. Even now, while I'm home by myself all day, I turn music on the instant James leaves for work and I listen to it until he comes home. When I go back to working on my homework after dinner, I listen to music. If I'm not technically listening to music, there's always some song playing in my head. Music is my life.

On Thursday morning I was feeling tense, nervous, scared, anxious and a variety of other overwhelming emotions because I was on my way to see the neurologist.  So I decided to pop in a relaxing CD: Jonathan Edwards. I played Shanty over and over again. It certainly was relaxing. I might as well have been listening to one of those obnoxious meditation CDs that always make me start giggling - except this actually worked and was very relaxing. I laid on the floor, closed my eyes and just listened.

I felt much better.

Then I had a variety of trivial issues en route to my doctor, which left me feeling highly frazzled by the time I arrived at the office fifteen minutes late - or maybe I'm just getting to that age where I speak my mind because, when I filled out the all-important paperwork for my neurological exam and was asked of the type and frequency of my drug use, I wrote, "Marijuana; not often enough."



Maybe it's the stress.

------------
Listening to: Jonathan Edwards - Shanty


------------

Gonna sit down in the kitchen
And fix me something good to eat
And make my head a little high
And make this whole day complete
Cuz we gonna lay around the shanty, mama
And put a good buzz on

Well pass it to me baby
Pass it to me slow
We'll take time out to smile a little
Before we let it go
Cuz we gonna lay around the shanty, mama
And put a good buzz on

Well there ain't nothin' to do
And there's always room for more
Fill it, light it, shut up
And close the door
Cuz we gonna lay around the shanty, mama
And put a good buzz on

We gonna sit around the kitchen
Fix us somethin' good to eat
And make ourselves a little high
And make the whole day complete
Cuz we gonna lay around the shanty, mama
And put a good buzz on
Cuz we gonna lay around the shanty, mama
And put a good buzz on

05 September 2008

Frustrated Friday

Day 086: Go away! No photos today, please, k, thanks.

Stress and Life's Troubles, you may Go Away! Now!

---------------
Listening to: NIL8 - Push It Down (You Mystery Date Dare Devil)
---------------

03 September 2008

My favorite hiking shoes

I LOVE Keen; I wish every pair of my shoes were Keens!! Some chics are into fashion, I'm into function. (Keen shoes are quite stylish, they just aren't available in a stiletto.)

When James and I went to South Dakota in June for our two-week camping trip interspersed with lots of hiking, instead of packing my Columbia hiking boots, I mistakenly packed something entirely different and inappropriate for miles and miles of said hiking. Upon realizing my goof, we immediately drove into Rapid City to Scheels to find the appropriate hiking footwear. After jogging around the store in a variety of shoes (how else am I supposed to try them out?) I settled on the Keen Voyageur you see here.

Day 083: Keen Voyageur Hiking Shoes

I broke them in by hiking Sunday Gulch in Custer State Park. If you've hiked in a brand new pair of shoes before, you know it can have painful results. Thankfully, my Keen shoes were so comfortable that I didn't even notice they were brand new! In the next few days we hiked to the top of Little Devil's Tower, Harney Peak, the Cathedral Spires and then a variety of small hikes throughout the Black Hills. My feet were perfectly comfortable the entire time. I never even got a blister.

The Voyageur is breathable (not waterproof), has plenty of traction (I climbed many a rock without incident) and my favorite feature - the heel wrap - it keeps the shoe snug to the back of your foot. Heck, even their shoelaces are functional; they are textured in a way which makes it hard for them to come untied on their own.

As expected, the Keen Voyageur is available for men. The waterproof version of the Voyageur is called the Targhee II.

I wasn't paid or somehow conned into writing about my Keen shoes. I just really love them! Good equipment is essential to a great outdoors experience and I wanted to pass along my recommendation.

---------------
Listening to: NIL8 - Porno Star
---------------

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails