04 November 2012

Jeannette-ically Modified Post

(Note: Prop 37 did not pass. Booo.)

I've been thinking of posting something, anything about GMOs for quite a while. But this blog is more of a creative outlet, an online journal, really. After years of this, it's morphed into a public way for me to share personal thoughts with my mom. I always think about her when I post. Per the news, I feel like I'm supposed to only post things with future employers in mind, but I just think about my mom.

While I do post about foods, I don't get too in-depth. I have another url for that though I have never used it. I have a vision in mind but I have never acted upon it. Maybe when I get a better computer...one that isn't so old that when I update firefox it suggests I "Get a new computer."

I digress.

I used to be junketarian. For fourteen years I didn't eat meat. Instead, I ate a lot of junk food. I rarely ever ate a raw fruit or vegetable. These days I grow my own fruits and vegetables!
I probably harvested my kohlrabi too late.

Nowadays I am more concerned about eating foods fit for human consumption than whether or not it's a fruit, vegetable, dairy product, or meat. I look at nutrition labels and it helps me avoid ingredients that are actually chemicals. But there is no label to tell anyone if the food or chemical they consume is based on genetically modified ingredients. Last weekend I visited my mom and when I mentioned GMOs, she had never heard of them.

At work I hand out a GMO pamphlet received from my Dr. Bronner's rep, which was published in part with the non-GMO project. Because it's after 8pm on a Sunday and I'm tired as heck, I'm going to just type some things from that pamphlet, and also paraphrase:

What are GMOs?

GMOs, or "genetically modified organisms," are plants or animals created through the gene splicing techniques of biotechnology (also called genetic engineering or GE). This experimental technology merges DNA from different species, creating unstable combinations of plant, animal, bacterial and viral genes that cannot occur in nature or traditional crossbreeding.
Virtually all GMOs are engineered to withstand direct application of herbicide and/or to produce an insecticide. Despite biotech industry promises, none of the GMO traits on the market offer increased yield, drought tolerance, enhanced nutrition, or any other consumer benefit.

Meanwhile, a growing body of evidence connects GMOs with health problems, environmental damage and violation of farmer's and consumer's rights.

Are GMOs Safe to Eat?

Most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe and instill significant restrictions or outright ban production and sale of GMO products. For some reason, monetary reasons I am sure, the US government approves GMOs. They cite supportive evidence based on studies conducted by the same corporations who who create them and profit from their use.

Are GMOs Labeled?

No.

What are the Impacts of GMOs on the Environment?

Over 80% of all GMOs grown worldwide are engineered for herbicide tolerance. GMO crops are responsible for the emergence of "super bugs" and "super weeds." GMOs are a direct extension of chemical agriculture and are developed and sold by the world's biggest chemical companies. Long-term impacts of GMOs are unknown.

Which foods might be GMO?

The following foods are at risk for being genetically engineered.
Alfalfa
Corn (at least 80% of corn and corn products, like High Fructose Corn Syrup)
Flax
Rice
Sugar Beets
Yellow Summer Squash
Canola
Cotton
Papaya
Soy
Zucchini

The following foods are considered high-risk by the non-GMO project:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Honey and other bee products

The more I learn, the more I realize that this information isn't complete, nor is it helpful. I mean, maybe it gives one a starting point to think - but there is a lot of food to fear. Most of the available foods seem to stem from science, not traditional agriculture. We're eating chemicals.

2 comments:

  1. You and i seem to be telepathically connected... You think of me when you're writing a post and I think of you when I read your posts!
    LOVE you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I knew I was right for hating summer squash this whole time! Thank you for providing me with a valid reason for shunning that stringy, disgusting mess.

    ReplyDelete

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